Independent, Expert EV Reviews & Advice Since 2006

Ford Mustang Mach-E Review

The Ford Mustang Mach-E offers genuine differentiation in the EV sector, with a comfortable, Mustang-like driving experience, a decent driving range and a competitive price.

  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E
  • Ford Mustang Mach-E SR charge curve
Green Car Guide Rating: 10/10

Key stats

  • Model/Engine size:   Ford Mustang Mach-E Standard Range RWD
  • Fuel:   Electric
  • Electric driving range (WLTP): 273 miles
  • Maximum rapid charging rate: 115 kW

Summary

  • Driving experience feels more like a Mustang than a typical EV
  • Comfortable ride
  • Test car had 273 mile official driving range – but a 379 mile range model is also available
  • Good value compared to many rivals

Background

Ford is late coming to the EV party, and it’s doing so with an EV called a Mustang – even though it’s an SUV rather than a sports car. So expectations may be mixed, but actually this is a very good EV.

Ford Mustang Mach-EFord Mustang Mach-E

Design & Engineering

Unlike some EVs on sale, the Mustang Mach-E has been designed from the outset to be an EV. This means the now familiar ‘battery in the floor’ platform, with a 77kWh battery in the case of our Mach-E Standard Range test car, although there’s also a 96kWh Extended Range version.

This EV platform means that space is freed up for a large boot, and space for five occupants (although the rear seats sit quite a lot higher than the front seats). There’s also a ‘frunk’, a useful compartment under the bonnet where you can store the charging cables, and lots of storage space between the two front seats.

Externally, there are styling elements from the Mustang sports car merged into an SUV body style. The wheels on our test car looked like they needed to be an extra inch or so larger in size – and you can get shinier alloys (as well as brighter colours than the grey/black of our test car).

There are no traditional door handles. Instead you press a button on the driver’s door and the door pops open slightly, allowing you to pull it fully open with a small handle. A set of numbers are illuminated on the driver’s door when you open it; this is a keypad, which can be used to unlock the car (which can also be done with your phone).

Ford Mustang Mach-EFord Mustang Mach-E

Ford Mustang Mach-E Driving Experience

The vast majority of EVs are fairly similar to drive. However the Mustang Mach-E feels genuinely different, as though it has been engineered to have the laid-back power delivery of a petrol-powered Mustang V8. This unique feel of the powertrain is combined with a very comfortable ride (no doubt helped by the lack of huge alloy wheels and low profile tyres), resulting in a very pleasant driving experience on most roads, and making long motorway journeys an extremely relaxing affair.

Our test car was a rear-wheel drive model (although all-wheel drive is also available), which adds to the authentic Mustang feel, and provides rewarding handling. Although the body of a Mustang Mach-E, being an SUV, has a higher centre of gravity than the Mustang sports car, because the weight of the powertrain is in the floor, the Mach-E has little roll around corners, despite the soft suspension.

The steering completes the Mustang feel, being easy to live with rather than sharp.

Performance is perfectly adequate, although the 0-62mph time of 6.9 seconds of our 430 Nm test car is somewhat eclipsed by the 3.7 seconds of the 860Nm GT model. The Mach-E weighs 1,993kg (120kg lighter than the 96kWh Extended Range version); a near two-tonne weight has an obvious impact on performance as well as on handling.

There are three drive modes: Whisper, Active and Untamed. These modes have to be accessed via the car symbol at the top right hand corner of the central touchscreen. In total you have to press three buttons to select a drive mode. It would be much better just to press one conveniently-positioned button once to do this.

The gear selector is the same as the one found in other Ford models such as the Kuga PHEV; it’s a rotary dial with a button in the centre which is typically for ‘Park’ on other cars, but instead in the Ford this button is marked ‘L’ and is for increased regenerative braking.

As you would expect from an EV, the Mach-E is quiet, including on the motorway, although there was some wind noise from around the driver’s door mirror area.

The driving position is good, but the steering wheel could extend out a bit further, and the (manually adjusted) seat could go a bit lower (opening the tailgate is also a manual task).

After trying to find a good driving position, the next thing we do with all press cars is to switch off the lane departure warning system before it intervenes and ruins the steering; with the Mach-E this is easy thanks to a small button on the steering wheel which just needs to be pressed twice to disengage the system.

The dashboard, like many new cars, is minimalistic, being dominated by a large Tesla-like tall central display screen (and a small instrument display in front of the driver), and compared to some rivals, the interior is quite basic (as well as dark).

The touchscreen displays the satnav at the top, and the basic climate controls are located at the very bottom. To adjust any of the details in the climate system, a larger window pops up on the touchscreen and blocks out the satnav map.

Ford Mustang Mach-EFord Mustang Mach-E

Ford Mustang Mach-E Electric Range and Charging

The official WLTP combined driving range for the Ford Mustang Mach-E Standard Range RWD is 273 miles. In real-world driving, including on motorways – when the range prediction was very accurate – the range when fully charged varied between 220-266 miles, averaging 248 miles, which is good for an EV with an official range of 273 miles.

In terms of where that can get you in the UK, the Mach-E drove at 70mph all the way from Fully Charged OUTSIDE in Farnborough to Manchester in one go with no stops needed for charging, with over 30 miles spare on arrival home. And there’s also an Extended Range Mach-E with a 96kWh battery with an official range of 379 miles, so range anxiety really shouldn’t be an issue with this car.

The Mustang Mach-E Standard Range can charge at rates of up to 115kW. A 10-80% charge takes 38 minutes at a 100kW rapid charger.

Electric cars do not charge at their maximum charge rate for an entire charging session – their charge rate typically starts off high with a battery with a low state of charge, then the charge rate decreases as the battery charge increases. See the charge curve for the Ford Mustang Mach-E Standard Range RWD from Fastned:

Ford Mustang Mach-E SR charge curve

How to charge an electric car

Ford Mustang Mach-EFord Mustang Mach-E

Price And Model Range

The Ford Mustang Mach-E Standard Range RWD as tested costs £41,330.

You can also opt for an all-wheel drive model for £46,750. This has a 335-mile range and is capable of a 0-62mph time of 5.1 seconds.

There’s also an Extended Range Mach-E with a 96kWh battery and an official range of 379 miles. This has a faster DC rapid charging rate of up to 150 kW (compared to 115 kW for the standard range model).

Finally there’s a Mach-E GT model, with 860Nm of torque, which is capable of a 0-62mph time of just 3.7 seconds.

Ford Mustang Mach-EFord Mustang Mach-E

Conclusion

The Ford Mustang Mach-E Standard Range RWD is very good (and comfortable) to drive, with a driving experience that is genuinely different to most EVs, and is more in keeping with that of a traditional Ford Mustang. Even in Standard Range form, the real-world driving range – much of which was on motorways during our test – of 248 miles – is impressive, and the Mustang Mach-E is priced competitively. It’s also practical and spacious. All this results in the Ford Mustang Mach-E being awarded a Green Car Guide rating of 10 out of 10.

Car facts and figures Ford Mustang Mach-E Review

  • Test real-world electric driving range: 248 miles
  • Maximum rapid charging rate: 115kW
  • Consumption (WLTP): 17.2 KwH/100km
  • CO2 emissions (WLTP): 0 g/km
  • Vehicle tax rate (VED):   £0
  • Benefit in Kind (BIK) company car tax liability (2021/22): 1%
  • Price:   £41,330 (not eligible for £2,500 UK government Plug-in Car Grant)
  • Insurance group:   TBC
  • Power:   269 PS
  • Torque:   430 Nm
  • Max speed: 111 mph
  • 0-62 mph:   6.9 seconds
  • Weight:   1993 kg
Paul Clarke

Review by:
Paul Clarke, GreenCarGuide Editor