Honda commits to hybrid future with new concept

Honda will unveil a hybrid sports car at the Geneva Motor Show in March, and an increase in the supply of Civic Hybrids to the UK.

The Small Hybrid Sports Concept is a sports car that features advanced hybrid technology – proving stylish design and driving enjoyment can be combined with low environmental impact. It was designed by Honda R&D Europe, based in Offenbach, Germany.

Honda has also announced that it plans to sell more than three times as many Civic Hybrids this year than in 2006. Supply of the petrol-electric Civic has been increased to meet overwhelming customer demand in the UK, meaning sales of the car should reach 3,000 during 2007.

Other Hondas at Geneva:

Driveable FCX Concept

A fully-functional Honda FCX Concept will be on display for the first time in Europe. The concept model features a newly-developed compact, high-efficient Honda FC Stack as well as a long-floor, low-riding, short-nose body. It offers a large, comfortable cabin and futuristic styling along with significant improvements in power output and environmental performance.

The FCX Concept has a range of 354 miles (Honda calculations when driven in LA4 mode) and a top speed limited to 100mph. Limited marketing of a new fuel cell vehicle based on the FCX Concept model is to begin in Japan and the US in 2008.

Next-generation clean diesel engine

Honda’s next-generation diesel engine uses world-first technology to reduce emissions to the same level of a petrol engine. A revolutionary catalytic converter reduces NOx emissions to a level that enables the engine to meet stringent US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier II/Bin 5 requirements.

The catalytic converter features an innovative system that uses the reductive reaction of ammonia to ‘detoxify’ oxides of nitrogen (NOx) by converting them into harmless nitrogen (N2). However, unlike Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems which use urea injection, Honda’s innovative technology uses ammonia generated within the catalytic converter.

Honda plans to introduce its next-generation diesel engine within three years.