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Volkswagen up!

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The forthcoming Volkswagen up! will be available with a new generation of three-cylinder petrol engines , including a BlueMotion Technology version with sub-100g/km CO 2 emissions. There are also plans for an electric up!

Volkswagen’s new small car will make its debut at the Frankfurt motor show in September.

The up! is an entirely new design, offering maximum space on a minimal footprint (3.54 x 1.64 m), making it ideal for driving in the world’s cities.

There are three versions for different budgets and needs: take up! is the entry-level car, move up! the comfort-oriented model and high up! the top version.

At the car’s market launch, there will also be two models based on the high up!: up! black and up! white.

Making its debut in the up! is a new generation of three-cylinder petrol engines, with outputs of 60 PS and 75 PS. The BlueMotion Technology version (including a Stop/Start system) will have CO 2 emissions less than 100 g/km. There are also plans for an up! with electric drive.

A new safety technology in the up! is the optional City Emergency Braking system. It is automatically active at speeds under 18 mph, and uses a laser sensor to detect the risk of an impending collision. Depending on speed and the situation, City Emergency Braking can reduce accident severity by initiating automatic brake interventions that can even avoid a crash. So far, the up! is the only vehicle in the segment to be offered with this function.

At 3.54 metres in length and 1.64 metres in width and 1.48 metres in height, the up! is one of the smallest four-seater cars. Its overall length consists of short body overhangs and a long wheelbase of 2.42 metres.

Use of space in the car is good thanks to one of the longest wheelbases in the segment combined with an engine that is mounted well forward.

The 251-litre boot is also significantly larger than is typical in this class. When the rear seat is fully folded, cargo space is increased to 951 litres.

The up! will be launched in Europe in December.