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BMW defends diesels and launches its own diesel scrappage scheme

BMW 335d Touring xDrive

BMW 335d Touring xDrive

BMW has said that future mobility will definitely depend on state-of-the-art diesels as well as electrification after launching diesel scrappage scheme.

In a statement that fights against the current demonisation of diesel in the media, BMW says that it has launched more electrified vehicles than any of its established competitors, but electrification is not the only sustainable drive solution: cutting-edge Euro 6 diesels reduce emissions and CO2 output.

The BMW Group says modern, efficient diesel engines ensure lower CO2 emissions and therefore make an important contribution to protecting the environment. In addition, when it comes to many unwanted emissions, diesels are just as clean or even cleaner than petrol engines. This can certainly be said of particulate, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions, meaning that three of the four major diesel pollutant issues have been resolved and no longer have any adverse effect on air quality. This is why the BMW Group is calling for objective discussions based on facts and scientific evidence.

The BMW Group is preparing an EU-wide fleet-renewal campaign. Initially until 31 December 2017, owners of diesel vehicles that meet Euro 4 standards or less will be granted an environment bonus of up to €2,000 (amount dependent on model bought) when they trade in their vehicle and purchase a new BMW or MINI. Their chosen replacement must be either a BMW i3, a plug-in hybrid or a Euro 6-standard vehicle with CO2 emissions of up to 130 grammes per kilometre (in the NEDC). This campaign will begin before the end of August. The bonus is in addition to any other government incentives.

Averaged across the fleet, BMW says that its diesel vehicles emit 40% less NOX than the German average, as reported by the Germany Federal Environment agency in April 2017. These figures are true for both Euro 5 and Euro 6 vehicles. In addition, experience gained through actual on-road driving between 2010 and 2015 means the BMW Group can offer an additional optimisation of the exhaust-treatment system for 225,000 of the Euro 5 models currently on the road in Germany – at no extra cost to the customer.

With regard to the current diesel debate, BMW AG Management Board Chairman Harald Krüger says: “For almost two years now, diesel technology – which is cutting-edge, highly efficient and popular with customers – has been deliberately and publicly discredited. This has caused tremendous uncertainty among millions of drivers and it’s not going to get us anywhere. The German automotive industry will remain strong in innovation: we will provide tomorrow’s mobility solutions.”

The BMW Group has repeatedly made clear that its exhaust treatment technologies are very different from others available in the market and the company continues to seek true competition in this area. The company categorically rejects allegations made by some media of non-compliant technology employed in diesel exhaust-treatment systems. “Investigations by authorities at home and abroad confirm that vehicles by the BMW Group are not rigged for testing purposes” Krüger explained.

In addition to the ongoing optimisation of the internal combustion engine, the BMW Group is forging ahead with the roll-out of electric mobility. Moving forward, flexible vehicle architectures and manufacturing facilities will allow the BMW Group to decide at short notice which models and volumes to produce with what type of drive: highly efficient combustion-powered, plug-in hybrid or fully electric.

In 2017, the BMW Group expects sales of its electrified vehicles to exceed 100,000 for the first time in a single year, with the all-electric BMW i3, BMW i8, BMW iPerformance plug-in hybrids and the plug-in hybrid MINI Countryman all contributing to the figures. The company’s electrified range currently comprises nine electrified vehicles and will be further complemented in 2018 by the all-new BMW i8 Roadster. Shortly after that, battery-only solutions will be rolled out across the BMW Group’s core brands, with Plant Oxford starting production of the battery-powered MINI in 2019, and the battery-only BMW X3 following in 2020. The following year, 2021, will see the launch of the BMW Group’s new technology spearhead: the all-electric BMW iNEXT.

FURTHER RESOURCES ABOUT VEHICLE EMISSIONS AND AIR QUALITY:

SHOULD YOU BUY A DIESEL CAR?

VEHICLE EMISSIONS EXPLAINED – SHOULD YOU BUY A DIESEL OR PETROL CAR?

WORLDWIDE HARMONISED LIGHT VEHICLE TEST PROCEDURE (WLTP)

HOW DOES THE NEW EUROPEAN DRIVING CYCLE (NEDC) FUEL ECONOMY TEST WORK?

NEDC FUEL ECONOMY TEST FOR PLUG-IN HYBRIDS

ELECTRIC CAR REVIEWS

GREEN CAR GUIDE

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CAR MANUFACTURERS GENERALLY DON’T PUBLISH THE LOCAL AIR QUALITY EMISSIONS OF THEIR VEHICLES, HOWEVER YOU CAN FIND ALL THESE EMISSIONS FIGURES AT:

http://carfueldata.direct.gov.uk

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